Letters to the Editor -- February 22, 2001

Published on Thu, Feb 22, 2001
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Letters to the Editor

Very inventive...
The Editor:
Many observers at the Blaine elementary school Invention Convention would agree that the students have imagination and creative spirit. Some of the students, however, may have felt their personal project was not a “prize-winner.” In my opinion, as a marketing director and “cyber-guru,” I challenge some of the judges criteria for scaling the young inventor’s projects. In my mind, the most talented young folks have ideas or projects that were or are marketable now! In fact, many items could face a market test and, with a little help from designers and manufacturers, could make money. I applaud all their inventors who, in my opinion, hallmark the talent and creativity that exists worldwide.

I challenge Blaine residents, teachers and officials to look beyond the tiny Blaine community and open up to the huge and wonderful world around us! Don’t stifle young minds and their creativity. Explore and congratulate all these kids – the silent winners!
Charles W. Dailey
Blaine

Many thanks
The Editor:
Thank you for promoting our event. The Arts & Jazz eventraised over $5,000 which will be used for scholarships, travel and educational expenses for the arts at Blaine high school.
Leslie Smith
Blaine Fine Arts Association

The Editor:
Meg Olson’s recent piece covering our district’s 21st Century Grant (“FSC’s offerings expanding”) was really quite masterful, especially given the fact that I was her source. She managed to transform my muddled explanation of the grant’s status into a satisfying summary of both its current standing and its trajectory for the rest of the school year. A good bit of magic on her part.
Plus your paper took the trouble to highlight some of our scheduled events in “Coming up...”. For all of this I am most appreciative.
Leaf Schumann
Blaine Family Service Center

Garden glory and gripes
The Editor:
First of all a hearty congrats to Dianna MacLeod for winning the bronze medal at the Seattle Garden show. It’s amazing what you can accomplish with nothing! Now, if the Blaine city council was smart, and I think they are not, they would find a piece of city-owned land downtown and give it to this lady along with about $10,000 of hotel/motel tax money and let her design a garden that would bring viewers into the downtown core to view it and take pictures.

Second, it is a crying shame that Frank Bresnan is leaving the council. Here is a man who grew up in Blaine and is an engineer who is very familiar with the wastewater treatment problems. The council doesn’t listen to him but instead listens to Grant Stewart who has only been here for a couple of years and has, in my opinion, created more hate and discontent from contractors in the area then anyone previously. No wonder Frank is disgusted and this city is in the financial disaster we are in.

Third, now that the last of the two people who got us into this current financial mess are packing up and leaving so they don’t have to face the music of their actions, it is time that the people of this town take stock of where we are and do something about it.
Dave White
Blaine

The Editor:
Too often, Blaine residents with special skills suddenly take the spotlight elsewhere like, say, Seattle while, unfortunately, the city of Blaine fails to grant them productive community roles. Or if such roles are offered, services will be understood to be voluntary.

This tendency, I call “the Blaine syndrome.” Briefly, it’s a frantic attempt to save the city by aiming for extraordinarily high goals while simultaneously overlooking, ignoring or demeaning potentially productive people living right here in Blaine who, I might add, have attained high goals of their own. Blaine needs people like that.

One such talent is Dianna MacLeod. I hope, therefore, she will be offered the opportunity to create a children’s garden in Blaine. She would love to do that but, unless she is appropriately paid, I believe she should totally reject any proposals. Why? Because she has decisively proven herself at Seattle’s exclusive Northwest Flower & Garden Show nothing more needs to be said. Faithfully assisted by her skilled husband, Brian, “The Fire Walk” won the admiration of thousands, including the judges. She returned home a medallist.

A children’s garden would enhance Blaine. It would be a fine addition for our school, too. The plot is near the campus, between G and H Streets.

Congratulations, Dianna and Brian. You are a creative team and a community treasure. I hope the city will attempt to help you find a productive community role. Forgetting the Blaine syndrome, I trust the chamber of commerce, school board, mayor, manager and city council will catch the vision and support you and, subsequently, the city itself all the way. Make it the next step.
Richard E. Clark
Blaine

Celebrating scouting
The Editor:
What can make millions of women admit to celebrating an 89th birthday?

Why, the 89th birthday of girl scouting, of course! On March 11, 2001 nearly 50 million girls and women – former and present members – will be proud to celebrate the 89th birthday of girl scouting in the United States. All week long, from March 11 to March 17, girls nationwide will be launching community service projects, showing off freshly pressed uniforms at local government declarations of Girl Scout Week and hosting celebrations to honor the movement that helps girls grow strong.

We have come so far, and can go so much farther. With your help, our communities can learn a tremendous amount about the relevance of our program in girls’ lives today. Girl scouts is today’s preeminent organization for girls, with more than 25,000 girl and adult members in Totem Council alone! As when founded in 1912, Girl Scouting helps cultivate values, a social consciencee and self-esteem in young girls, while also teaching them critical life skills that will enable them to succeed as adults.
Tina Johnson
Seattle

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com