Letters to the Editor -- February 14, 2002

Published on Thu, Feb 14, 2002
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Letters to the Editor


Removing marker is not the answer
The Editor:
We want to point out that representative Hans Dunshee has acted irresponsibly in describing how he would “remove the monuments, even if he gets arrested for it.” While his statement is certainly irresponsible, the fact of the matter is that to “rewrite” history by removing a historical monument erected with honorable intentions for the purpose of positioning himself politically is totally irresponsible.
Are we going to have a Washington state version of the Confederate flag removal controversy going on in the state capitals of some southern states?
The sanctity of the International Peace Arch State Park has been and is now a concern of a number of citizens in our community on both sides of the border. It is, as Samuel Hill intended it should be, a place where citizens could reflect on the meaning of brotherhood and the unity of our two nations. Over time this has been extended to include the peaceful co-existence of all peoples. The removal of an historical monument to appease current politics or viewpoints, erodes the sanctity of the park and its Peace Arch monument. And to do so for political name recognition, even to honor a deserving person, without consulting those who have devoted untold hours of time and labor to the preservation of the park, is also a great injustice. It is clear that representative Dunshee did some research on the particular marker that offends him. Had he done more research to better understand the other monuments that also stand on that ground, he might have realized how unfortunate his “solution” is to the racist issues that the name of Jefferson Davis represents. The extension of his “logic” to remove the sins of the past by removing monuments to people who have been deemed worthy of such tribute in the earlier history of our nations is faulty. Would we dare to go back and remove the monuments to Presidents Washington and Jefferson because they were “slave owners?”
We are also troubled by the fact that a deserving Civil War soldier has not been recognized for his contributions (whether or not he was or was not a slave or African American). We can understand why Mr. Dunshee should feel it necessary to do so now. But, to do so without regard to the understanding of both the park, the International Peace Arch monument, and the people who inspired its construction, dedication and meaning to peoples from around the world, creates another oversight or injustice as well.
I hope you will not support the dedication name change of highway 99 and the removal of the historical marker. There are many other ways to honor a brave soldier of the North without the rancor and divisions brought about by the emotions of a single representative.
John and Carol Choulochas
Blaine

The Editor:
In the recent article about the so-called Confederate marker, Hans Dunshee is quoted as saying that the “object of the Confederacy was to perpetuate slavery.”
Let’s have some historical accuracy. The object of the southerners was to be allowed to sell their raw materials to anyone they wanted, and not just to the mills of the northern United States. Slavery had little to do with the cause of the war and was only brought into the mix in order to motivate the Union population.
Very few people at this point would agree that slavery was right or moral, and we can all be thankful that it no longer exists in this country, but how many of the people of Whatcom County or Washington think that the federal government should have the right to mandate that we sell all our apples and grapes to California? That was the situation in the United States prior to the Civil War and that is why the southern states seceded from the Union.
Let’s get our history straight before we start arguing about Jefferson Davis.
Calvin Armerding
Blaine

The Editor
I grew up in Whatcom County and am familiar with the marker. I suppose I learned who Jefferson Davis was from the marker long before I learned it in history class. As for removing it, I feel that would be a mistake. Jefferson Davis is part of history, as is the civil war and everything associated with it. So are Jefferson Davis’ accomplishments prior to the war.
Let’s leave history as it is, and leave the marker alone. If Mr. Dunshee wants to name a road after someone else, let him do it in his district. If the marker offends him that much, he can use the Lynden crossing to return to the US after his trips to
Canada.
Jeff Haws

Via the Internet

A day of prayer...
The Editor:
World Day of Prayer 2002 will be observed by Christians in over 170 countries around the world on Friday, March 1. In Blaine the service will be sponsored by the women of local churches at 11 a.m. at the Free Church Unitarian at 1218 Harrison Avenue, a handicapped accessible facility.
Since 1887, World Day of Prayer has brought together in informed prayer and prayerful action, international men and women from many backgrounds, cultures and Christian traditions. Since 1941, World Day of Prayer has been sponsored in the United States by Church Women United, a grassroots ecumenical movement of Protestant, Roman Catholic, Orthodox and other Christian women.
“Challenged to Reconcile” was chosen by the women of Romania as the theme of this year’s celebration. The Romanian women ask us to pray with them for understanding, peace and love.
Please join with us in the World Day of Prayer 2002 celebration and worship.
Laura Amundson
Blaine

Fabulous food bankers
The Editor:
As a member of this community I wish to take this time to say thank you to all the volunteers at the food bank for all their hard work. These people work very hard to make sure that people of the community have food to feed themselves and their families. Without the food bank in Blaine most people would find it hard to make ends meet.
These volunteers are at the food bank on a daily basis gathering, sorting and packaging food for the people to pick up on Tuesday and Fridays. These volunteers donate their time and work for the people of the community. From time to time we need to let these volunteers know that they are appreciated for their hard work and unselfish time to the community. Again, thank you. Your work doesn’t go unnoticed.
Donna Gibson
Blaine


Please help...
The Editor:
The Parents of Seniors 2002 are raising funds to sponsor a drug and alcohol free grad night party. We have selected an event which we keep a secret from the seniors until they are on the bus going to the event. This years fundraisers have been recognized by our Lt. Governor Brad Owen in the “Take a Page” publication February 2002.
We are in need of your help. The Parents of Seniors 2002 are sponsoring two more fundraisers and are asking for your support.
Our first fundraiser is from February 7 to March 15 – we are selling Easter lilies. They come in a six-inch foil wrapped pot and are nursery quality and are being sold for $8 each. Pick up date is Saturday, March 23 at the Blaine elementary school library from 9 a.m. - noon. We will be happy to deliver your order - just let us know.
Our second fundraiser will be Butter Braids to be delivered right before Mothers Day on May 4. They are $8 each and come in raspberry, cinnamon, cream cheese, apple, peach, cherry, blueberry and caramel rolls flavors. These coffee cake style pastries are delicious and are excellent to serve family and guests.
We appreciate any help you can give our organization. Blaine high school class of 2002 is the largest class to graduate from Blaine with 130 students. Our goal is to raise $13,000 for this event so that each student can go without any cost to them. We are one-fifth of the way there.
You can order any of these items from any parent of the senior class 2002, or Anna Folk at 332-5902 or myself at 332-2740. If you are in the area, orders can be dropped off at the high school office.
If you would prefer to make a donation of cash or perhaps a gift certificate or item that we can raffle off the night of the event please call me at 332-2740.
Thank you for your support.
Sheila Connors
Blaine

The Editor:
Wow! The business and community members of Blaine are showing tremendous support of our youth. Blaine Youth Baseball has been receiving team sponsors and donations and we are truly grateful. There are teams that still need a sponsor though and if you are considering supporting a team (or making a donation) please contact Sheldon Miller at 332-6333 for information on how to do so.
This season’s first registration day went really well with 75 boys and girls signed up so far. We have one more opportunity for you to sign up your baseball or softball players on February 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Blaine elementary school library. Please bring a copy of their birth certificate. We have lots of room left and hope to see many more kids registered. Remember, February 16 is the final date for registration. Another important date is February 22, which is for tryouts for all registered 10 to12-year-old boys so the ‘Majors’ coaches can determine their teams. This is at 3:30 p.m. at the high school football field.
Baseball season is coming up fast! We’re looking forward to fun, fair, competitive ball games in a safe and friendly environment!
Larissa Dhanani
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com