Letters to the Editor -- April 18, 2002

Published on Thu, Apr 18, 2002
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Letters to the Editor



Songbirds? Who cares!

The Editor:
Ken Knutsen’s endearing column regarding the extinction of birds was truly touching. However, the extinction of various species of all kinds of animals has taken place since the beginning of life on earth and is necessary for the survival of other species. Without extinction there would be no evolution. Take mankind for instance. Had not some unsuspecting dolt of a Neanderthal croaked off, we wouldn’t be here. As lovable as those foreheads that jut out past their chins are, I, for one, am glad they are not here anymore.
Domesticated cats are indeed skillful, ruthless, heartless killers. They are driven to it. It’s instinct. Except our Manx, who is a wuss. Our parrot owns him, but he would definitely enjoy dining on our lovebird. You see, I’m a bird lover too and a cat lover. But, let’s not upset the balance of nature and the food chain for a few birds that none of us could name if our life depended on it. And lets certainly not mobilize a public relations campaign about something that no one really cares about. If you really care about the survival of species, don’t spay or neuter your cats. Let them roam free.
Me? I’m going back to my dinner to try to eradicate the chicken.
Terry Pilant
Blaine

Eagle rescuers
The Editor:
We wanted to publicly thank Wildlife Rescue, Inc. for their help in rescuing a young bald eagle with a broken wing along Birch Point Road on the afternoon of Sunday, April 7. For those people who stopped to ask about the eagle, Wildlife Rescue was able to capture the eagle and take it to receive medical attention.
Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is a non-profit charitable organization that responds to wildlife emergencies in Whatcom County. They make every effort to return injured or orphaned wildlife to its natural habitat. They can be contacted at P.O. Box 4276, Bellingham, WA 98227.
Many thanks, also, to those of you who contributed to our Wildlife Tree in the Points of Light Benefit at Spooner Creek last December. We were able to see your contribution dollars at work in our community.
Nancy Mills
Blaine

Veteran infighting
The Editor:
There is some confusion lately in town. There is a American Legion post trying to start up. They have a temporary charter to operate. The people doing this are mad. They lost officer elections last year and walked out of the post that has been serving Blaine for 80 years! This is nothing but sour grapes. They have lied to us (Post 86). They are trying to say you need a new post in Blaine. I think the great people of Blaine will see through the smoke and mirrors. Personally I would not be having my meeting in motels and pizza parlors. What the people of Blaine need is to stop this abomination. I’m writing this because veterans deserve better.
Kevin Wymond
Birch Bay

Successes in schools
The Editor:
Blaine primary and elementary schools celebrated another successful sock hop on February 8. The Atlantics, with our own Jason Ferguson, presented us with another great performance. Families enjoyed a night of music and refreshments. We would like to thank Leaf Schumann and the Rising Tide Grant, the Blaine elementary school for the use of the gym, the Blaine Primary PTO for the organization and refreshments, and the many local business for raffle items: Figaro’s Pizza, Blockbuster, People’s State Bank, and Cost Cutter.
Tracy Gobbato, Blaine primary PTO
Blaine

The Editor:
This letter is to inform you about Becky Riddle. She has signed an athletic scholarship to run track at University of Utah. It’s a full out of state scholarship she’ll start school there on the first of September.
If you don’t remember, she was a first place finisher in league, district, and finished in the top at state last year. She then went on during the summer and won district and west coast Junior Olympics. From there she went down to California and placed at nationals. She was a four year letter winner at Blaine high school in basketball, volleyball, and track. Her track coach is Tapio Kuusela and his phone number is 801/581-5778 if you have any questions.
Dave Riddle
Blaine

The Editor:
Last month high school art students from Snohomish, Skagit, Island and Whatcom counties displayed their artwork in a showing at the Educational Service District 189 offices in Mount Vernon.
The artwork was judged and the following students were selected and won in their categories: Justina Gumley, Rose Smith, and Dana Werdal.
They now have their artwork on display in Olympia where it will be judged in the state competition.
Please congratulate them and wish them good luck in Olympia!
Leslee Smith
Blaine

The eye of the storm...
The Editor:
I have watched the reaction to Linda Lawrence’s letter over the past couple of weeks and felt it was time that I had to make comment, as it is our business that is at the center of this controversy. Blaine Marine Services had provided service to the Blaine police vehicles for many years and to the best of my knowledge there has never been a single complaint regarding our service or prices.
We purchased this business in September of 2000 and have invested heavily to build a new facility, add personnel and equipment, and update systems to further enhance our service to all of our marine and automotive customers.
Our labor rate to the Blaine police was, based on information I received from the police department, 27 percent cheaper than Diehl Ford. We have reduced parts pricing and provided quality local service without the need for added mileage, wear and tear, and fuel consumption yet for some reason, unknown to us, this business was lost without notice.
We have been unsuccessful in getting a clear explanation as to how Diehl Ford could be less costly for the city on a true “apples to apples” comparison, but we have accepted our fate. Hopefully one day they will give us an opportunity to once again provide quality service on a local basis.
The main point I want to make is that this business was not lost due to quality of workmanship, service or prices. Chief Elfo told me they had no complaints with our quality of service.
The saddest part of this is the reduced local employment and the fact we have less money circulating in our depressed city. The spin-off effect of this was felt by local suppliers, the local restaurants and elsewhere throughout the city. This has been a very tough winter for Blaine Marine, our staff and the rest of our community, but we will survive.
Bob Brooks
Blaine Marine Services

Union busting or workers right to choose?
The Editor:
Right now, in Washington state, workers are being denied a basic right of choice. Laborers from both the private and public sectors lack the freedom to withhold their membership from unions.
Adoption of a Right to Work law in Washington state would give workers that freedom. Employees would no longer pay dues under threat of firing. Forcing workers to belong to and fund unions is not only unconstitutional, but also detrimental to the local economy. Nearly 80 percent of Americans support the implementation of Right to Work laws.
When laws are changed to allow workers the freedom of choice, state economies and individual worker’s salaries flourish. Research based on Right to Work laws adopted in other states shows marked success.
Our close neighbor, Idaho, has enjoyed exceptional industry growth since the enactment of a Right to Work law in 1986. Since that year, manufacturing employment in Idaho has increased by 39.6 percent, while Washington’s manufacturing jobs have increased by a meager 9.5 percent.
An initiative filed earlier this year would bring choice to the workplace. Private sector workers, as well as all state employees, such as teachers, would be able to make their own decision involving union membership.
I-777 is a Right to Work initiative, allowing the working women and men of Washington to choose their representation. To learn more about the initiative, visit www.for777.org.
Rachel Smith
Seattle

Who's visionary?
The Editor:
After mayor Dieter Schugt addressed my sin of favoring the mayor-council form of government, just a few minutes before our city manager’s July 17 public meeting, I nearly apologized for having been born. I vowed never to write another letter to the editor. I wanted to avoid sabotaging city progress toward a blossoming future.
So here I sit, breaking my promise, but not without a reason.
The Northern Light of January 17 published council plans for a development fee overhaul. April 11 brought another headline: “Council slashed development fees and red tape.”
David White, Andy Anderson and Frank Bresnan Jr. requested such economic restructuring several years prior. David and Andy were crudely outspoken. Frank was diplomatic. Neither crudity nor diplomacy worked. They were ignored.
Had their voices been respected, Blaine would be better off today. I fear action so recently taken is too little, too late.
Total credit for the cited economic overhaul belongs to those former councilmen, all of whom were “voices in the wilderness.” No credit belongs to the pretentious copycats who thought it was their idea.
The council owes David, Andy and Frank an apology. They were not the villains. They were visionaries.
Richard E. Clark
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com