Letters to the Editor -- August 15, 2002

Published on Thu, Aug 15, 2002
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Letters to the Editor



Lies belittle harsh reality

The Editor:
On August 8, a co-worker told me about the news she heard of a woman who was raped, kidnapped and eventually escaped in Blaine. Today, August 9, I received The Northern Light in the mail with the article and description of the offender of this horrible incident.
What has me peeved is that on the 11 p.m. King 5 news, it was reported that this woman made the whole story up; how pathetic. There are already too many rapes and kidnappings that happen and many go unreported because of these type of women who desire attention and report falsely. To this woman who made up the story: I pray that you never actually have to deal with the actual reality of a horrifying rape, kidnapping or the aftermath of nightmares that last for years, it isn’t a game. You’ve just made it worse for many women who have gone through the reality or will go through it.
Monica Kerr
Birch Bay

Roads need your vote
The Editor:
I urge citizens of Blaine to vote yes on Proposition 1 (Street and sidewalk maintenance Levy) in the September 12 election.
The city council unanimously approved this measure as a means of continuing to maintain the streets of this city of ours. This was a result of the MOST Committee recommendation of the best way to fund street maintenance.
You stepped forward in 1996 to approve the special street levy, which was for construction of streets, sidewalks and storm drain systems. Money for repair and upkeep were not included. That money came from general funds transferred to street maintenance. The recent chip seal work came from those funds. General funds were used because local gas tax revenue dropped from $350,000 to $100,000 per year.
It is extremely important for you to know the council and staff are committed to continuing this same funding from general funds for street maintenance. This Proposition 1 is to put the necessary additional funds to keep up the level of street maintenance on the regular overlay and chip seal streets.
The scheduled town meetings of August 15 and 29 at the senior center and August 22 at Semiahmoo Fire Station will graphically outline streets that will benefit from this measure over the next four years. Blaine website has details at www.cityofblaine.com.
The question came up from those in west Blaine about Drayton Harbor and Lincoln Road. These are both county roads. The county has on its schedule to continue and widen Lincoln all the way to Blaine Road next year. This has been a high priority on the city’s agenda in working with the county.
When we arrived here to make Blaine our home 16 years ago there were potholes in most streets in town. You have stepped to the plate before, and a yes on this proposition now will continue to make Blaine a city to be proud of.
Dieter Schugt, Mayor
Blaine

Free wheelin' thanks
The Editor:
On August 7, 2002, as I was going home from grocery shopping, I made it as far as the Mitchell Avenue bridge over I-5 when my three wheeler became a ‘free-wheeler’.
While I was looking to find the problem, three young people came over and one got under and in a few minutes had put the chain back on the sprocket.
Since I am deaf as a post, I didn’t get any names and my thanks were pretty feeble.
Whoever you are, you are a credit to your family and your generation.
Larry Hammer
Blaine

Points to ponder
The Editor:
If we can agree that mankind is the most intelligent of the world’s creatures, I can’t help but ask why? Why do we have anyone going hungry for instance? We now know that we can raise all of the food necessary to feed everybody. In fact if we worked it right we could feed the whole world. Why does anyone have to go hungry in the United States?
We seem to find it necessary to restrict people on the highway, we don’t let the driver do 100 miles an hour down the freeway. Why? For the protection of the rest of us.
Then why is it so difficult for us to set up restrictions in other areas? The protection of the environment for instance. People object strenuously if they’re not allowed to hunt in certain areas, or we cut back on the amount of fishing, things of that nature.
Why is it so difficult to restrict industry in certain areas? We must admit that what they do is harmful to us, but still we don’t seem to be able to put any controls on it.
Why is it so hard to admit that everyone needs attitude education? Why do we feel that we know everything? Then it takes us many years to learn that we don’t know everything. I have one solution that I believe would work, and this is not a criticism of our present schools, but we’ve got to start with our children earlier. We have to begin to teach attitudes before they are two years old, and that of course involves teaching the parents too.
Let me ask this question. How many parents are qualified to be parents when they first get married? I certainly wasn’t. I reflect on some of the blunders that I made. So if we can arrive at a method of teaching healthy attitudes very early, it may answer some of these why questions.
Trav Skallman
Blaine

Perfect posies
The Editor:
For many years, my wife and I lived in Blaine. The past several years we have resided near Birch Bay. We come into Blaine several times a week to shop, buy gas, etc. This summer season we have noticed the hanging flower baskets adorning the main street. We just have to make a comment about them.
Whoever purchased them and maintained them deserves a vote of thanks. In our opinion they are simply gorgeous! We only wish we could have such nice plants hanging in our yards. They are a thing of beauty!
Mick & Nora Wagelie
Blaine

Cougar is real threat
The Editor:
Unbelievable! That our department of fish and wildlife officer, Troy McCormick, would make a statement to The Northern Light reporter Meg Olson, that we shouldn’t be alarmed to have cougars as neighbors, just watchful.
When should we become more than just watchful? After livestock is injured or killed, a child mauled or eaten. Will you tell us when?
I believe that sightings within a mile of a heavily used state park should draw serious concern and should be considered a threat!
It becomes more apparent that it will take a tragedy to change the minds of the media, fish and wildlife department and the general public that something needs to be changed.
Please ask yourself this – did we have this degree of bear and cougar threats before the passage of I-655? (Initiative I-655 banned the use of hounds for hunting these predators.) How ironic that these sightings have drastically increased in the past five years!
McCormick also stated that “we just can’t draw a line and put them on the other side of it.” Well, yes you can! There was a well established line before passage of the above-mentioned initiative.
Now the taxpayers and consumptive users of this state get to fund “state hungers” to manage the problem animals the same way, the same methods (hounds), as they were managed before the passage of this initiative.
This hunting technique was a scientific wildlife management tool that brought revenue to this department. Now it’s an expenditure that hurts the budget and most importantly puts us all who use the outdoors in danger!
Let’s end this “ballet box” wildlife management process that has been transpiring since 1996. Our wildlife managers are professionals, let them manage our wildlife using scientific data and proven methods. Forcing them to comply with the emotionally driven initiative process ends up costing us financially, not to mention, puts us in imminent danger from these predators anytime someone decides to just go for a walk in the local park.
There are organized efforts taking place as you read this, that will give this power back to the department so these animals can be managed in the safest and most economically feasible manner available, utilizing effective proven management tools that were available before the I-655.
Please contact Washingtonians for Wildlife Conservation at www.w4wc.org to learn more about these efforts.
Brad Otto
Blaine

Artrain thanks
The Editor:
When the United States Canada Peace Anniversary Association first applied to have the Artrain USA visit Blaine, we were told it would be both a traveling art gallery and a community building experience. Before, during and after its visit to Blaine this proved to be true. The event brought individuals and groups together to help show how Blaine has grown and changed. Visitors from as far as Montana and California, as well as many local people, told us what a wonderful experience it was.
Naturally, this was only possible because of the contributions of money, time, effort, space, products and services of so many of our friends and neighbors. Our sincere appreciation goes out to the American and Canadian Consulates, the City of Blaine, BNSF Railroad, US Bank, Washington State Arts Commission, Whatcom Transit Authority, Peace Arch State Park, a long list of local businesses and community groups and all the volunteer artists and volunteer guides. A special thanks to former astronaut George (Pinky) Nelson.
To see months of work come together including our first International Peace Arch Historical Exhibit. Thanks to Dale Schrader for donating the space for the exhibit in his building. This coming together of residents, organizations and talented people could not have happened without the help of so many people. Again, the USCPAA thanks everyone who helped us make Artrain USA visit to Blaine, WA such a success.
Christina Alexander
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com