Letters to the Editor -- October 31, 2002

Published on Thu, Oct 31, 2002
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Letters to the Editor


Thanks to rescuers
The Editor:
This letter is written because of a great deal of disappointment in the news media. We are the three survivors of the boat that sank outside Drayton Harbor on October 16. All of us realize we have much to be grateful for, and without the services of several agencies this event may have ended tragically.
The day after the rescue, KIRO 7 News called and asked for an interview. The three of us discussed this with reluctance, not wanting to go in front of a camera. We decided to do the interview with the thought that it would be the best way to give our thanks to the people who rescued us and gave us medical aid. Nothing we said about the emergency services was broadcast on the news.
We hope this letter will be published in order to let the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard and the Bellingham and Blaine EMTs know how grateful we are for the services they provided that evening. They all went far and beyond the call of duty. We were witnesses to real professionalism and some truly kind and caring people.
Our love and gratitude goes out to these people and the people on shore that heard us yelling and were on the phone with the Coast Guard. We would also like to thank the owner of the Chevron station in Blaine for opening his station and making us a cup of tea for the ride home to Bellingham. Thanks must also go out to Verizon Wireless for providing the service they did.
Once again, thank you all for helping us be here today.
Dennis O’Shaughnessy, Leslye Asher, Wayne Kallmyer
Bellingham

Support the Food Bank
The Editor:

The Blaine Food Bank has been serving Blaine and the outlying areas for over 30 years. Our home has been a small room in the United Church’s basement and is now very user-friendly in its own building donated by the Ken Kellar Foundation. We have a walk-in freezer and a walk-in cooler which allows us to keep and store a large variety of goods to give away on our two distribution days. We have a container outside where we can store extra canned goods given by large donations and by the government programs so nothing given to the Food Bank goes to waste because we can’t store it or use it.
And yet... The need goes on! The number of families we serve each week is up three new families each week and currently we are helping over 150 families a week with an average of five people in each family. Seven hundred and fifty hungry people in need each week. Each recipient is allowed to come only once a week and we are open for distribution on Tuesday and Friday mornings.
To do this job we coordinate our volunteers, young and old, male and female, to bag/sort and distribute, to move boxes and go after supplies. We welcome new workers as long as they come with a smile and a happy heart! Speak to our manager John McParlin if you are interested.
Our officers look ahead for our needs and the needs of our community. They see to the mundane items like plastic bags and paper bags, gas for vehicles, new tires. All the stuff it takes to keep the Food Bank running smoothly.
The Blaine Food Bank fills a need in the community and it fills our hearts with love and caring as we are able to share in our abundance. Please share with us!
Example: for Thanksgiving we will be giving each family a $10 Cost Cutter grocery store gift certificate to help them for the holidays. A cash donation from you will help with this cost.
We at the Blaine Food Bank give thanks to you, the community of Blaine, for your generosity that you have always shown.
Joan Gregory
Blaine

Blaine drivers are nice
The Editor:
I’ve been in Blaine for three years and during the months of spring, summer and fall, I ride my bike because I love it. I have been many places on it.
Now I have a two and a half year old that usually goes with me and loves it. You usually hear of people complaining about motorists “not sharing the road.”
Well, I’m writing to thank all motorists in Blaine, and those who pass through, for respecting me, with or without my precious child along for the ride. It is sometimes a nuisance to go around a cyclist, and sometimes it’s no problem at all. Well, thank you for “sharing the road” with me.
Laren Andres
Blaine

The fundraising continues
The Editor:
The two of us would like to thank the Blaine community for its generous support of the Blaine high school wind ensemble and our upcoming trip to Funabashi, Japan in February.
On Saturday, October 19, our fundraising committee hosted a car wash, a craft & rummage sale, and a golf tournament; with your tremendous generosity these events were able to raise $486, $1,500, and $2,800 respectively. You are the best!
Thanks also to Mel Freal and Nancy Hamburg for helping with the car wash, Nancy Reilly and Eydie Berry for organizing the craft/rummage sale, as well as all of the band parents and students who worked so hard all weekend.
A special thanks to Dolores and Neal Holleman for their enthusiastic work in organizing the golf tournament and the sponsors who helped make the afternoon so enjoyable for all who participated.
We also extend our appreciation to the Blaine Fine Arts Association and its president, Leslee Smith; without whom we would be lost in this endeavor and to Allie Ryser for offering her beautiful handmade stained glass band hearts as a fundraiser for the band.
We are truly blessed to have such a great, heard-working parent group and a caring, supportive community.
Dorita & Bob Gray
Ferndale


The Editor:

Thank you to all those that attended the Blaine Force softball crab feed. Your patronage made for a tremendous success. A special thanks to Bob Briscoe, Gary McGee, Gary Duntser, Kevin Haines, Blaine Crab Co., Star Crab Co., and Trilogy Crab Co., for donating the crab, Dakota Creek Roadhouse for donating the building and the Rockerfellas band (Dave Swantos, David Chapman and Tim Walter).
Rob Adams, Force coach
Blaine

Beribboned and drug-free
The Editor:

Get the scoop on the group!
Team Youth to Youth that is. It is a group of amazing, devoted, hard working students, that spend many days doing work to insure a drug free environment for ourselves and our peers. One way that we do that is a program called Red Ribbon Week.
Red Ribbon Week is celebrated across the nation as a week when we recognize our rights to live in drug free families, live in drug free communities, and learn in drug free schools. Red Ribbon Week began in 1985 when Enrique Camerenas, a federal agent working in a border town, like Blaine, was killed by drug traffickers. Family, friends and community members who were tired of drug related violence began wearing red ribbons to publicly express their desire to lead drug free lives.
Last week, Blaine middle school celebrated Red Ribbon Week. In four days students learned through fun activities about the dangers of drugs (including alcohol and tobacco).
One of the activities we did was to have theme days. On Tuesday we had “Put a Cap on Drugs” when students wore hats; on Wednesdays we had “Follow Your Dreams, Stay Drug-Free” and students wore pajamas; on Thursday we had “Scare Away Drugs,” students wore scary faces and hair; on Friday we had “Borderites have Better Things to do Than Drugs.” On that day, students wore outfits that represent their hobbies or sports or they wore black and orange.
We also had a “Question of the Day” every day that helped us think of what we would do in certain situations. If you put an answer in, you had a chance of winning a prize and having your answer read on the morning T.V. show. These are some of the activities that we did for Red Ribbon Week.
Clinton Macleod, Karlina Sexton, Megan Farrell and Max Orrantia
Blaine

Airport relocation?
The Editor:

At last Monday night’s meeting of the city council, the airport commission put forth a proposal regarding Skallman Park to cut down the trees, fill in the pond and lease the land. The money used by burying Skallman Park would be used to enhance revenue for the airport. This is in addition to cutting down the trees of privately owned land which according to the owner, was first appraised at $135,000. The money used to pay the owner of the trees, cut down the trees and bury Skallman Park would be borne, according to the airport commission, by the taxpayers of Blaine.
An outside consultant, David Ketchum I think his name was, stated in an earlier report that there were four options the city had in regard to the airport; leave it as it is, improve it, move it or close it.
For me I like the idea of having an airport in Blaine, but not at the cost of losing a city park for airport revenue and perceived safety concerns. An experienced pilot at the meeting stated that the airport was vital to the safety of those traveling by air.
He also stated that Skallman Park was no hindrance, in his opinion, to his flying into Blaine. In fact he stated that Skallman Park would be a great enhancement for any improvements at the airport.
With the ongoing controversy regarding the airport throughout the years in Blaine, the cost of improvements, perceived safety concerns because of the truck route and school, maybe it’s time to take a good look at relocating the airport. The money that could be saved by just not cutting the trees and burying Skallman Park would go a long ways towards buying new land for an airport. I trust that the property at the airport is very valuable now and would also help in any relocation.
The council has agreed to meet at Skallman Park at noon, Friday, November 1, to look at the concerns and proposal put forth by the airport commission. They stated those that are interested in the airport renovations and future of the Skallman Park are welcome to join them.
If you have any opinion regarding saving or destroying one of our last treed secluded city parks, please contact the city and send or voice your opinion. Once the park is gone it can never be replaced. If you voice your opinion then at least you have helped in the decision. If you don’t voice your opinion then you have left the choice for others to decide for you.
Patrick Madsen
Blaine

Election reflection
The Editor:
We wanted to take this opportunity to voice our support for Georgia Gardner for State Senator - 42nd District.
After viewing the Bellingham Herald sponsored candidate debate between Georgia Gardner, Dale Brandland and Don Crawford, it is obvious that Georgia Gardner is the clear choice for our future. Within and outside of that forum, Georgia possesses an enormous background in all the issues, provides clear and concise answers as well as solutions to the problems confronting our state.
Having managed her own business, Georgia was provided with a multitude of first hand experiences confronting businesses in our state - experiences that are without a doubt, invaluable. Secondary to this, her accounting background itself becomes an asset to the state.
We have known Georgia for 12 years and with full conviction can state that she has worked tirelessly for the public and her constituents supporting: higher education opportunities; small business development; job preservation in our communities; public safety; street improvements; and basically a fiscally accountable government.
Georgia is a great communicator and a better listener. She confronts the tough issues, studies all options available and makes the right choices.
Please join us in re-electing Georgia Gardner for State Senator in the 42nd District.
Steve and Julie Sanders
Blaine

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The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

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Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com