Letters to the Editor -- May 22, 2003

Published on Thu, May 22, 2003
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Letters to the Editor


Remember them
The Editor:

Was it on the field
at Gettysburg?
Did you fall
Without a word?
Or was it Afghanistan?
Iraq?
When the deadly rifle
Crack�d
Soldier
Where did you fall?
Or do we remember you at all?
As on this Memorial Day
Gaily we go out and play.
George Tranberg
Blaine

Blaine's the name
The Editor:

I can�t take it anymore. The few people that think Blaine needs a new name listen clearly! Give it a rest and get over it! The name of this town is Blaine. As far as I�m concerned, anyone who wants to change the name of this town doesn�t know anything about Blaine�s history, or the history of its people.
I visited a lot of different places while I was in the military, but I always wanted to come back home to Blaine. I played football and wrestled for Blaine which meant a great deal to me. Now I have the wonderful honor of coaching both of those sports right here in my hometown. I had and still have an enormous sense of pride representing Blaine through athletics.
The fifth generation of my family is now proudly growing up here in Blaine. That�s right � fifth! My great-grandfather laid the roots of my family here in Blaine back in the early 1900s. He passed away in 1999 after reaching the age of 100. So if he spent all those years here happy with the name Blaine, then you can bet that I believe I should do the same.
You say that we need to change the name to help the economy. Well, I have a question for you. How many times a week do you drive to Bellingham to buy things that you could buy right here in Blaine? Am I to understand that if we change the name to Sparkling Waters or whatever other glitzy name you come up with, that you would then gladly buy things here instead of going to Bellingham? Come on, you�ve got to be kidding. The name has nothing to do with the economy. Everything we need is right here. We just need to start using what we have more wisely. That�s a whole other discussion.
I guess the bottom line is that when you have roots somewhere as deep as mine are here in Blaine, you tend to get defensive when somebody comes along and tries to pull them out by changing the very identity that the roots were created by. So if you really have that much of a problem with the name Blaine - move!
Scott Dodd
Blaine

I have the answer
The Editor:

I have given this many fleeting moments of deep thought and I am sure that I may have the solution to the world�s problems.
1. Shoot all jaywalkers and litterers (and all the stray pets).
2. Pave the national parks (make more room for the tourists).
3. Change Blaine�s name to Mud Bay (anything is better than Sparkling Waters).
Paid for by the Committee to elect Sean Smyth for President.
Sean Smyth
Blaine

Raising speed limits will not increase growth
The Editor:

After reading the letters from Mr. Dixon and Ms. Hollenbeck, I fail to see how raising the speed limit on D and H streets will increase growth in the city of Blaine. I do see however that any increase in the speed limit will endanger the lives of the people of this city. A study by the Oregon Department of Transportation shows that a person is five times more likely to die from being struck by a vehicle traveling 40 mph as they are being struck by a vehicle traveling only 20 mph.
Also, by just not accepting the �residential argument� doesn�t make it go away. Those small buildings that line both sides of D Street, they are called houses. People and animals live in them. The large buildings on H Street, that is a school complex. Small people, who don�t always look both ways as they cross the street, go in and out of them on a daily basis. Coincidentally those same small people, who are hard to spot sometimes because they are so small, also show up on D Street every single day. Now is that extra minute you gain by driving 45 mph, really worth increasing the chance of someone dying fivefold?
The logic of raising the speed limits to increase economic growth is ludicrous. If there was a correlation, then maybe we should raise the limits to 60 or 70 mph. Then we would have to fight off new businesses with a stick.
Blaine�s stagnation is not due to our 25 mile per hour speed zones; every city in the nation has restricted speed zones. Blaine is not growing because the economy nationwide is in a slump. Just walk through Bellis Fair Mall or the Peace Arch Outlet Mall and observe the empty stores.
Waste your energy on trying to persuade people to change Blaine�s perfectly fine name if you want, but don�t risk my kids and my neighbors because you don�t have the patience to drive the speed limit: a speed limit that protects all of us.
Mark Woodral
Blaine

Thanks for special memory
The Editor:

After many visits north, we knew when the time came to retire, that Blaine was our choice. It proved right for us and we have seen so many good changes over the years.
When our 60th wedding anniversary reception was held April 26 at the Blaine senior center so many friends and family attended with cards and gifts. Now with our family we wish to thank each and every one for their kindness. The Blaine senior center helped to make it all happen with the help of the catering service, they did a very good job.
It will be a special time to remember as we know our family put a lot of effort into this project and we appreciated it so much. All of them worked as a great team. Thanks again.
Mary and Ted Onyon
Blaine

Blaine originally called Drayton Cove
The Editor:

I would like to add my comments and thoughts regarding the unfortunately heated local debate regarding the town�s name change. Changing the name of the town should in no way be taken personally by the locals. I consider myself a local as I live and work here, and can only conjure positive things coming out of a name change after living here for 10 years!
This is historical fact: In 1841, the Wilkes expedition, a U.S. based group, named the townsite Drayton�s Cove � that was in 1841!
We all know there were a couple of name changes and for the area�s current detrimental business woes in part stuck with Blaine in 1884 named after a presidential candidate who lost the election, which can be studied in the history books. Why the name stuck is anybody�s guess, but it did! If a community can change the name in 1884, why not do it again in 2003? If the town name was changed to Drayton�s Cove or Drayton�s Harbor, (anything with a water connotation and making sure to drop the name Blaine), I believe and so does everyone else I speak with, that property values would go up within the first year of change.
Tourists would conclude that the community sits on the water. As the waterfront is the areas biggest asset and amenity, why not build on that? Business would absolutely pick up, there would actually be people walking around town, and not just those turned around at the border.
Folks that like the name Blaine and want to keep it, could still address their mail as Blaine, mail is delivered via zip codes so that wouldn�t change. I have used the name Drayton�s Cove on mail and it got to me fine.
People complain about the costs, when they don�t want to see the huge benefits, which outweigh the costs by miles! Think about what is in a name. Think of all the doubters and pessimists, how much less business would Semiahmoo Resort suffer if instead it was named �the Blaine Resort?� I rest my case.
Bill Becht
Blaine

We'll miss you
The Editor:

I had the privilege of being Albert Wegner�s caregiver and even more important his friend since last July.
Albert was the most honest and respected man I ever met. A day never went by without a call from friends, colleagues, and neighbors. There were many special people in Albert�s life. The Jernigans, the Crammes, especially Pat Cramme who always came over when Albert needed him. Also, Gail Petersen, Lise Tramberg, Brad Brevik, Ashley Glover, Lynn Strickler, Lloyd Jordan, Renee Michael, Harlon Harvey, Doug Higgins, Henry Peters.
I want to thank my family for giving me the freedom for devoting my complete attention to Albert�s care and well being. Albert and I spent many hours talking and laughing and of course just a little gossiping. We planned trips we�d like to take. Albert desperately wanted to go to Hawaii and Mexico. I want to thank my daughter Michelle for helping me care for Albert and for trying to save his life Friday night. Also, Jason for fixing Albert�s bedside light, it meant so much to him to be able to turn it on at night when he couldn�t sleep. I want to thank Mary Wagner for her support and kindness she gave both Albert and I. It made Albert very happy how much she cared about him. She remained a loving and loyal friend to the end. I couldn�t have done it without her good natured attitude. We will miss him dearly. Especially when I get in my plastic Ford to go for a ride. I never knew he hated my car. I only hope we meet again in Mexico and be best friends again. Vio Con Dios my friend.
Linda Leininger
Blaine

Spit gambling
The Editor, city council & city manager:

Blaine - let your voices be heard. At the April 14 Blaine city council meeting, the subject of writing an ordinance prohibiting gambling in the Marine Planned Resort (MPR) Zone, was discussed.
At that time councilor Liebert recommended that the community be part of the process of deciding whether or not to allow gambling at the Semiahmoo Resort.
It is therefore very important that the Blaine community express their opposition, in writing, to gambling before the next council meeting on Tuesday, May 27.
As a community, we need to ensure that residential areas are protected from the devastation of gambling. If gambling was ever permitted at Semiahmoo Resort, the Semiahmoo golf course, Loomis Trail golf course or any residential areas in Blaine, it would be a most difficult, if not impossible, decision to be reversed. We must remember how difficult it was to try and close down the adult store on Peace Portal Drive. Although the tax revenue from gambling may sound attractive during an economic downturn, this revenue would be rapidly offset by the additional costs of policing an area where gambling is permitted. Statistic shows that crime rate increases in break-ins, family violence, illegal drugs, etc.
When writing the ordinance prohibiting gambling the city council must include all establishments on the spit at Semiahmoo and any establishments in the city of Blaine where children under 19 years of age would frequent.
Nicole McCaig
Blaine

Successful season
The Editor:

The Blaine high school girls varsity tennis team hasn�t had a lot of coverage in the newspaper this spring, but they have had a very successful season.
The team is made up of 11 girls � Linsey Taylor, Jessica Freeman, Andrea Klemmt, Krista Jones, Jennifer Kramer, Rachelle Jackson, Lisa Kent, Beth Black, Simran Kang, Sydney Stanley and Jessica Teng. These girls have committed to practicing and improving their skills every day after school to learn a lifelong sport. They all practice good sportsmanship, tennis etiquette and have hard work ethics. Besides, their abilities on the court, their cumulative GPA is 3.81. As a parent, I�m very proud of the character of these girls and their accomplishments.
Also, I would like to thank coaches Pat Green and Laura Nelson who have devoted many hours of their time to develop the girls tennis program. They deserve a lot of credit and appreciation.
Linda Jones
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com