Letters to the Editor -- December 16, 2004

Published on Thu, Dec 16, 2004
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
A successful airport in Blaine would be its own worst enemy. The current location in the heart of the city is a poor location for any airport but it is OK with so few users. If the airport were to become successful and indeed generate 5,000 “operations” as predicted in the study, then the airport would need to close and move out of downtown Blaine. The city of Blaine would be ruined by all that air traffic.
In addition to considering expanding the airport, Blaine needs to consider closing the airport and selling the land. We have a fine airport 15 minutes down the freeway from Blaine. The current land at the airport has far better uses than as an airport. All that valuable airport land is now used to house 26 aircraft and some visitors.
Blaine could sell that land for the benefit of all its citizens and use the money to pay for the new sewer plant or to buy some parkland on the spit. Maybe we need a new survey that asks citizens if they would rather have a park on the spit or a busy airport downtown.
Blaine needs a financial analysis for this business question that considers the value of Blaine’s airport property.
Tom Long
Blaine

The Editor:
This letter is in response to the letter written by Joyce Crane in the December 9-15 edition of The Northern Light.
Officers only pull you over if you have committed a traffic infraction or if they have probable cause to do so. I for one applaud their traffic enforcement, as it seems to be necessary in this area. I have been cut off, almost broadsided when I had the right of way and passed like I’m standing still when I’m already going five m.p.h. over the speed limit on Interstate 5. And that’s not even including the speeding semi-trucks on SR-543 southbound from the border. Catering is one thing, breaking the law is another.
Also, try some Blaine/Birch Bay cuisine and shopping. You might help a local business stay in business.
Charles Lloyd
Blaine

The Editor:

We will soon complete the capital improvement projects made possible by the bond supported by local voters. On behalf of the school board, our staff, the community and especially our students, I would like to thank everyone for their support at the polls and patience during the construction phases.
The outstanding facilities are used year ‘round for a wide variety of events. It is extremely important that visitors to our community know exactly where the buildings are located. With this focus in mind, the directors have requested that we refer to our buildings specifically. It is especially important that we reference the “Blaine School District Performing Arts Center,” not the “Blaine Performing Arts Center.” This will enable users to more easily locate the facility as part of our campus.
Thank you for your cooperation in helping to avoid confusion.
Mary Lynne Derrington, Ed. D
Superintendent, Blaine school district
Blaine

The Editor:
This is a “how come,” or “what is the logic of,” the location and designation of post offices and zip codes. The question is why do I have to go to the Blaine post office? Why do I write Blaine as my return address? So often, I have to explain to people that I don’t live in Blaine; I reside in an area commonly referred to and accepted as Birch Bay.
Blaine has a beautiful post office; its population is 4,500. Birch Bay’s population, according to the latest census, is 6,000 plus. According to the new master plan recently approved by county leaders, Birch Bay’s population will soon rise to a projected 12,000 plus. Even Acme has a Bureau de Poste, as does Custer. How come?
Tom Vuyovich
Birch Bay

The Editor:
I was burning with shame and anger to see the shabby and insulting treatment of the Umatilla and Lummi tribes by the Whatcom County council. In a last minute reversal of planning commission and staff recommendations, the Umatilla tribe was left holding the bag on its $3 million investment in land proposed for an intermodal facility in Custer near I5 exit 270 when the county council voted at their last meeting of the year to prevent development along the rail spur line in Custer by stripping the area of its provisional Urban Growth Area (UGA) status. An earlier court case had ruled that no development could take place unless the area was within a designated UGA.
The Umatilla tribe became the largest owner in the UGA when it foreclosed on a defaulted loan. At the conclusion of the hearing testimony, which overwhelmingly supported the site as an ideal intermodal location, several council members began a protracted verbal attack on the tribes and other owners as outsiders out to destroy the community, etc. Without giving opportunity for rebuttal, the council voted 5-1 to remove the UGA status of the area. At this Custer massacre, the Indians lost big time.
Jean Freestone
Bellingham

The Editor:
Here’s a little poem I came up with while walking along Birch Bay Drive.
The Ubiquitous Seagull
They are here, they are there,
they are everywhere.
They are soaring up there
in the air.
And if I am not truly alert
and aware.
They are dumping white stuff
into my hair.
They squat and squawk and sometimes rest.
Methinks them Seagulls are
just a pest!
Hal Thomson
Birch Bay

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com