Letters to the Editor -- November 10, 2005

Published on Thu, Nov 10, 2005
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
Thank you and your paper for conducting the candidate forum at the Blaine Senior Center on November 1. By the turn out, the citizens of Blaine were very responsive and I gathered, appreciative, of your efforts.
While things are still fresh in my mind I would like to make several observations.
I was somewhat overwhelmed by the number of offices being sought by the candidates. As a result, insufficient time was available for questions and answers. I realize time constraints and an effort to provide all offices an opportunity to be discussed is responsible for this dilemma.
Specifically, I would like to have heard from all Blaine City Council candidates – even those that were unopposed for office. I also thought some, or perhaps all questions, should have been answered by all of these candidates. Given the amount of time available I understand the format that was followed.
Given the size of the crowd, perhaps in the future the PAC at the school could be used. It was very difficult for us ‘old-timers’ to hear all of the comments and see the candidates.
I did not stay around for the pro/con on the airport issue. At this time, I find it most unfortunate that council members and/or candidates have taken public position with regard to this matter. As I see it, there are three items that must be available for anyone to make any sense out of this situation.
1. Results of the public vote on the ballot measure unanimously adopted by the city council.
2. The findings of the Committee for Alternative uses for the airport; a committee, again, that was unanimously voted for by the city council.
3. Whether the FAA will fund the proposed airport master plan.
Until this information is available and only until that time, I find any council member and/or candidate should refrain from public comment. Since that point has passed, we now see the scare tactics in all their glory from both sides of the issue. There is an acronym used in Tom Clancy’s Red Rabbit that describes the situation – SWAG (Stupid Wild Assed Guesses).
Enough editorializing – that’s your job. Thanks again for your efforts.
Dennis Olason
Blaine

The Editor:
I have heard and read many comments of our new Veteran’s Memorial, which will be located at the northeast corner of 3rd and H streets, on property so generously donated by the city of Blaine.
It has been an arduous process of which the outcome (in my opinion) has been well worth all of the effort put forth by all involved. Also thanks to public works operations supervisor Leroy Dougall and his wonderful workers who performed the amazing task of physically removing everything at Lester Park and building the new Veteran’s Memorial, honoring the memories of the courageous men of Blaine who lost their lives in their valiant efforts to ensure that every one of us may enjoy the rights and freedoms that we have today.
Therefore, it is with great pride that on behalf of the American Legion and VFW, we invite all residents of Blaine (including Birch Bay) to the dedication of our Veteran’s Memorial and also our Veteran’s Day service which will be held at the conclusion of the dedication on Friday, November 11 at 10:45 a.m. on the northeast corner of 3rd and H streets.
Also on behalf of the American Legion and VFW I would like to invite all veterans to march in the parade which will preclude the dedication, and will muster at Wolten’s True Value at 10:20 a.m.
Jeffrey L. Wier, commander, American Legion Peace Arch Post #86
Blaine

The Editor:
I’d like to address Lorry Hartman’s heart wrenching experience of running over a kitty with her car. I am so sorry for what you went through, Lorry. By taking the time to write a public letter to the owners of the cat and the wonderful man who caringly disposed of the body, you called attention to the importance of animals in our lives.
As such, I think this is a great opportunity to remind people that the best place for cats is indoors. Our area has seen a lot of growth, more people, more traffic – and more ways for cats to be injured or killed. Here are a few of them:
· Being hit by a car
· Being tortured by cat haters
· Being stolen for profit (sold to research labs at $5+ a head)
· Being attacked by other cats, dogs, coyotes, raccoons, owls or eagles
· Skin cancer and sun damage (especially white cats)
· Poisoning by rat/mouse bait, pesticides or antifreeze
· Becoming trapped in a shed or garage, or in new home construction
· Being shot by people angry your cat is pottying in their flowerbeds
· Contracting FIV (Feline AIDS), Feline Leukemia (FeLV), Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) and upper respiratory infections.
If, like me, you’d like your cats to have access to the outdoors, there are many safe ways to do so. There are cat enclosures (if built yourself, very inexpensive – and you can keep the litterbox outside this way!). There are “cat fences” that go atop existing fences to keep your cat in your yard. There are many more – and all of these ideas are available online or in the catalog section of Cat Fancy magazine.
If you love your cat, please consider what I’ve written. If you can’t do it for your cat, think about the rest of us. Most people automatically swerve to avoid hitting a living creature. And, like me, many of us unavoidably run over a poor, sweet pet – and will forever be haunted by the memory.
Vanessa Hamilton-Highfield
Blaine

The Editor:
Airport! Airport! Airport! Why don’t we just change the name of the paper to The Northern Airport or perhaps The Weekly Airport, because that’s all this paper contains anymore.
All of this actually makes me relieved that I’m selling my house because this town is no longer what it used to be - quiet, quaint and contained some balance of camaraderie. Not anymore!
From the building boom that is destroying what little we have left of nature, the wall of condos that takes away residents’ former views of the waterfront, to raised rates on garbage, electricity, gas and the endless debate about the crummy strip that someone decided to call an airport, to the now proposed idea of increasing property taxes, is enough to make anyone want to get out.
You know, it’s almost laughable to see people getting their panties in a bunch over an airport, when so many other things in the town need attention. I guess that lovable nickname, “Blaine Brain” really does fit! Unfortunately, yet another small town is being destroyed by greed and overpopulation. Way to go, Blaine!
Veronica Horwell
Blaine

The Editor:
History teaches that pacifism does not protect against threats to peace. Peace with force may not be peace, but peace without force is fragile.
Peace has only been achieved by force resulting in either of two forms of peace. One form is an oppressive peace as when the German Nazis over-ran other countries or peace in freedom when oppressors are fought and suppressed as after the victory of the allied forces in World War II.
Peace cannot exist without force. Peace when left to its own device dies a slow demise. Our veterans are the peacekeepers of a civilized society.
Roger W. Hancock
Auburn

The Editor:
We San Juan Island residents are interested in transportation issues. Surrounded by water, we fly or float to go anywhere. So I have watched the Blaine Airport debate with some interest. Like the blind person who relies on hearing, we who are without a highway have a healthy respect for airports. As such, it is inconceivable that a growth-oriented community would speak of voluntarily giving up their airport, and putting up a truck stop. And, to turn its back on federal funding, which would upgrade the facility to receive business aircraft of companies interested in relocating to small communities is, at best, misguided. Cities, like Blaine, from coast to coast are upgrading airports and courting clean industry.
Those who would argue that an existing airport in Bellingham serves that purpose are wrong. Those businesses that want the convenience of a location at or near the airport will just locate in Bellingham. Look at any metropolitan area. Smaller, community airports are surrounded by clean manufacturing, offices, and golf courses. I don’t have any idea what businesses locate near truck stops.
Fred Schumacher
Friday Harbor

The Editor:
Five playboy pilots? Are they separate from the rest? What makes you a playboy pilot? I guess we found out who’s behind the airport expansion.
Do you want playboy pilot Bob Brunkow on city council voting on airport issues? Does playboy pilot Jeff Robinson think Blaine can’t make it without him? He forgets that he did come for the cheap land. He forgets that Blaine was here long before he showed up. The playboy pilots think talking down to the citizens of Blaine is going to convince this small fishing village to give them their airport.
Then there’s Phil Boyer, president of some pilots association. His website tells of sending strongly worded letters to towns who want to close airports. The site mentions general aviation airports closing at an alarming rate due to lack of revenue generated.
Let’s not feel too intimidated by the playboys unless Blaine gets $16 million from the FAA. I found that when that happens, our state will have an obligation to assure the airport stays open. If it’s losing money, too bad. Taxpayers will be slaves to the five playboy pilots forever.
Rachel Hrutfiord
Blaine

The Editor:
The Community Assistance Program (CAP) Thanksgiving dinner basket program will be held this year on Wednesday, November 23, from 1 to 5:30 p.m. Baskets may be picked up at the old Radio Shack storefront across the parking lot from Cost Cutter Grocery Store.
Those families residing in the Birch Bay, Blaine, Custer and Point Roberts area who desire to be recipients must get on the list to receive their basket through the family service center at the Blaine school (call 332-0704).
Baskets are sized and assigned for each individual family on the list.
There are no baskets for walk-ins.
Last year we provided the makings for a complete Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings to 185 needy families on the afternoon before Thanksgiving Day. More than 450 children and 275 adults had a full Thanksgiving dinner as a result of the financial donations of generous friends and neighbors.
Those wishing to contribute to this charitable work may do so at Cost Cutter, Bank of America, Sterling Bank and other supporting businesses in Blaine. Stephani’s in Birch Bay is also a donation point. Look for the sign at the business.
Donations may also be mailed to the CAP Thanksgiving Basket Program, 580 C Street, Blaine, WA, 98230.
Brent Brentnall, director,
Community Assistance
Program
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com