Letters to the Editor -- May 11, 2006

Published on Thu, May 11, 2006
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
Our pancake breakfast will be held May 20 on the third Saturday of the month from 8 to 11 a.m. From now on, the breakfasts will be the third Saturday of each month.
We realize this change was not reflected in the Young at Heart article published in the last issue of The Northern Light and apologize for the error on our part.
Thanks.
Turtle Robb, activity programmer
Blaine Senior Center

The Editor:
I’ll get directly to the point: I’d like to thank the Blaine police department for their civility but also for their proficiency in carrying out their duties. Why? I woke one morning to find my bike stolen. For this aging ex-fisher (a casualty of the Boldt decision). That’s rather like a Cadillac being stolen from a member of the establishment!
I reported the theft early that morning. About four to six hours later I found the bike parked at my apartment. Thanks, officer!
But earlier I wandered over to Mike Smith’s bike shop. The consequence: I now have a bike more congenial to my needs. So thanks, thief. The law of unintended consequences worked in my favor – this time. Yes, I need the exercise and the price of gas is doggone high!
Ken Knutsen
Blaine

The Editor:
Julia Ward Howe who wrote the Battle Hymn of the Republic also wrote the following:
Mother’s Day Proclamation:, Boston, 1870. Mother’s Day was originally started after the Civil War, as a protest to the carnage of that war by women who had lost their sons. Here is the original Mother’s Day Proclamation from 1870.
Arise, then, women of this day! Arise all women who have hearts, whether our baptism be that of water or of fears!
Say firmly: “We will not have great questions decided by irrelevant agencies. Our husbands shall not come to us, reeking with carnage, for caresses and applause. Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn all that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience.
We women of one country will be too tender of those of another country to allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs. From the bosom of the devastated earth a voice goes up with our own.
It says “Disarm, Disarm! The sword of murder is not the balance of justice.”
Blood does not wipe our dishonor nor violence indicate possession.
As men have often forsaken the plow and the anvil at the summons of war, let women now leave all that may be left of home for a great and earnest day of counsel. Let them meet first, as women, to bewail and commemorate the dead.
Let them then solemnly take counsel with each other as to the means whereby the great human family can live in peace, each bearing after their own time the sacred impress, not of Caesar but of God.
In the name of womanhood and of humanity, I earnestly ask that a general congress of women without limit of nationality may be appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient and at the earliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace.
Julia Ward Howe, Boston, 1870
One hundred and thirty six years later, our husbands, wives, sons and daughters are still “taken from us to unlearn all that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience.” All across this country and in Iraq mothers mourn for their injured and dead children.
So, mothers of Whatcom County, as you open your gifts, or eat that special meal, please think of those mothers who have lost their children, and say to yourself.
“What can I do to put an end to this carnage.” It is up to us.
Heidi Wood
Blaine

The Editor:
In your May 4 issue there was a wonderful letter reporting on the Drayton Harbor Maritime’s pancake breakfast. This was the second annual breakfast with proceeds going to the Drayton Harbor Maritime’s Clancy Youth Sailing Program and raised over $600 in profit.
The letter was authored by Pam Amundsen. What she left out of her report was that Pam Amundsen was the driving force behind the breakfast this year. She organized, shopped, communicated, liaised and personally worked her tail off to make the breakfast the huge success it was. She simply would not take any “no” for an answer. My hat, and those of the other DHM board members, are off to her along with our grateful thanks.
Eric Barnes
DHM Board Member
Blaine

The Editor:
After reading this week’s paper, I was appalled by one letter written to you by C. Kinney in Blaine in regards to the articles written by Jerry Gay. I personally think that the articles written by Jerry Gay are the best part of your paper. Not only do they have great insight, they make you ponder what humans are doing to this earth. In the disputed article, there was a picture of a dead animal. C. Kinney had an issue with the presence of this picture in The Northern Light. However, C. Kinney obviously did not get the point of the article. The point that Jerry was trying to make was about the devastating effects of deforestation.
Due to the fact that humans are destroying all habitats for animals, they are being killed running and trying to find a safe haven. Do people even think about taking away homes of animals to build more golf courses or homes for humans. I question if C. Kinney is perhaps uncomfortable with this subject because they are one of the people that only think of themselves. Not only are homes for animals being destroyed, but our oxygen supply is decreasing with each tree that is cut down.
My advice to C. Kinney is to really read the message that Jerry Gay is giving in his articles. Put your defenses away and hear the real story lady, because he writes about reality whether you are comfortable with that or not.
K. Ulrich
Birch Bay

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230 or fax 360/332-2777.
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com