Letters to the Editor -- January 15, 2009

Published on Thu, Jan 15, 2009
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
Just prior to the holidays, I wrote a letter to The Northern Light expressing concern about running on a local road. In my haste, I simply addressed it The Northern Light, Blaine, WA 98230.
The letter was returned marked “Insufficient address to deliver.” I now understand that any letter mailed in Blaine goes to Everett for sorting, including mail for addresses in Blaine, which I find surprising. While it was entirely my fault, I do know that all Blaine mail carriers would have known the location of The Northern Light.
I mention this because some time has passed since the incident occurred, about which I was writing. A few days before I wrote this letter, I was driving south on Lincoln Road, early in the morning when it was still pretty dark and I just missed hitting a runner coming from the opposite direction.
As someone who also enjoys running, it is good to see others keeping fit in this manner. However, Lincoln Road is extremely narrow and does not have proper shoulders.
With the lights of an approaching vehicle and the runner not wearing reflective clothing it was very difficult to see him.
I am persevering with sending this letter for publication because I hope it may prevent a terrible tragedy. I would caution against running on Lincoln Road, even in broad daylight. It is hardly wide enough for two large vehicles and, in my view, dangerous even without runners. There are many more desirable and safer roads and paths on which to run in this area.
Sadly, I also understand that any plans to widen Lincoln Road are on indefinite hold.
Trevor Hoskins
Blaine

The Editor:
Blaine airport now closed
Millions in canceled leases are owed
But the land remains unsold
And we will pay the price!
Nancy Hobberlin
Blaine

The Editor:
A few days before Christmas, more than 200 families here in the Blaine area received Christmas dinner boxes through the work dozens of volunteers and the generosity of several local contributors and businesses.
This willing army of helpful children and adults put a complete and nourishing Christmas meal together. It consisted of: An eight-pound ham roast, a gallon of milk, corn, beans, mashed potatoes, three pounds of bananas, pineapple, a fresh loaf of custom baked bread, butter, and a 10-inch pie for dessert.
As well, Totally Chocolate gave generous portions of chocolate and cookies for each family, and 200 large boxes, which were used for distributing the food. Cost Cutter, Great Harvest Bread, and Crazy Dazy gave significant price breaks for purchases.
Seventy-five volunteers worked anywhere from two hours to four days to procure, prepare, and distribute the boxes. The Wolf Den Cub Scouts (Pack 25) assembled and taped the empty boxes to be loaded. Blaine high school Students with a Purpose (SWAP) had a dozen students loading boxes. Two church volunteers obtained bids, procured food, and loaded and stacked over 200 boxes. One couple, Gerald and Sandra Weatherly, coordinated the project starting in early November.
All financial contributors are local and included four individuals, three churches and two businesses. Their gifts ranged from $100 to $2,500. Best of all, here are the number of people who were helped this year with a Christmas Dinner Box: 210 families in the Blaine and Birch Bay area. This included 437 adults and 448 children, for a total of 885 people.
On behalf of the Peace Arch Christian Ministerial Association, we want to thank everyone who made this project possible for the seventh year. We deeply appreciate their concern for the community and their generosity in this practical gift of food for the holiday.
Charles Gibson
Blaine

The Editor:
A new lease on life at 140? That’s what George, a 140-year-old, 20-pound lobster, is getting, thanks to a  restaurant in New York City  that recently agreed to send him back to his ocean home. PETA predicts that the trend in lobster liberation will continue. As we learn more about sea animals and how similar they are to us in so many ways, more and more people are having trouble with the idea of putting them on the table.
Like George, lobsters can live to be more than 100 years old, they recognize individual lobsters, remember past acquaintances, have elaborate courtship rituals, and help guide young lobsters across the ocean floor by holding claws in a line that can stretch for many yards. Lobsters can also feel pain, and they suffer immensely when they are cut, broiled, or boiled alive.
You don’t have to send a lobster back to sea to make a difference: Just keep these clever crustaceans out of the cooking pot and try healthy vegetarian foods instead.
To find out more, visit www.LobsterLib.com.
Paula Moore
People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals
Norfolk, VA 

The Editor:
The Blaine Food Bank would like to take this opportunity to extend our heartfelt gratitude to all those who generously donated their time, their goods and their dollars to our agency over this past holiday season.
Our contributors are too numerous to name however there are two notable exceptions. Firefighters Local #3867 in partnership with North Whatcom Fire & Rescue Service donated over 1,800 pounds when the final tally was complete.
Honorable mention must go to all Blaine’s school children from the elementary school to the middle school to the high school (including the music department. and the honor society) because their combined resources totaled more than 3,500 pounds.
Thank you, Blaine, Birch Bay, and Custer for your continuing support to our area’s food bank. We couldn’t do it without you!
Robin Kendall
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230, fax 360/332-2777 or
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com