Letters to the Editor -- April 30, 2009

Published on Thu, Apr 30, 2009
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Letters to the Editor

The Editor:
It is with mounting disgust that I keep reading the furor for the whineys about the speed limits in Birch Bay.
What can possibly be the matter with you lead-footed cretins? No matter what time of the year it is, day or night, there are pedestrians, bicycles, and yes-little kids on Birch Bay Drive.
I have lived above Birch Bay Village for nine years and have lost count of the times that a child has run across the road right in front of me or rode his bike into the edge of traffic. This road is not a Nascar track!
The speeders in Birch Bay Village are very easy to spot, however, because they have they green diamond- shaped decal in the lower left corner of their windshields that I can easily spot as “you” come flying up on me over 40 as I faithfully do the speed limit. Please be sure to notice my license frame that says “the closer you get, the slower I go.”
The speed limit is 25 miles per hour in the following cities: All of Whatcom County – year round. So what makes Birch Bay so special that we need to speed in the winter here, especially Birch Bay Drive.
May you “can’t” drive the speed limit because you are “special” or “in a hurry.” Guess what, you ain’t. if you don’t like it, move away.
PS: Does somebody have to die to get your attention? Ever see a kid get hit by a speeder? I have.
J.F. Dale
Birch Bay

The Editor:
I love roundabouts. I mean, who wouldn't like to freely flow through an intersection rather than hassle with stop and go, wondering who has the right of way and who is supposed to wait for pedestrians?
Oh, right, pedestrians... forgot about those.
Roundabouts are great for cars, not so great for trucks and atrocious for pedestrians, especially those with limited mobility. I actually do like roundabouts and we need more of them, but building them at one of only two pedestrian crossing areas into the downtown core represents very poor judgment, indeed.
I didn't used to feel this way about roundabouts and pedestrians until I helped a blind man in roundabout crazy New Zealand, with a seeing eye dog no less, who had this sign around his neck, “Please help me cross roundabouts.” And, yes, I did help him cross.
Roundabouts have their place just not where the state would like to put these.
Michael McAuley
Blaine

The Editor:
Two weeks ago, Blaine historian and author Richard Clark wrote a letter to the editor announcing a special Father’s Day concert to benefit new playground equipment at Peace Arch State Park.
The concert will be performed by pianists Victoria and Dan Sabo. I would like everyone to know that the Sabos are the “real deal.” They are nationally recognized composers and performers who just happen to live close by, in Bellingham. The concert promises to be enlightening and entertaining for the whole family. Dress is casual and admission is by donation. It’s all good!
I am writing to help explain why Peace Arch State Park needs a benefit concert to replace its playground equipment. The equipment currently in use has reached its life expectancy and is deteriorating to the point where it needs to be removed.
Unfortunately, because of the state’s budget crisis, park ranger Jason Snow must find his own funding sources to replace the equipment. If he is unable to secure adequate funding, Blaine will soon be without a safe attraction, in a beautiful outdoor setting, for kids to enjoy.
As it happens, commercial-grade, industrial-strength playground equipment is jaw-droppingly expensive. For example, a set with enough features to keep a dozen kids active at the same time costs at least $35,000. A moderately elaborate set, with at least 25 different activities, can cost $50,000 to $70,000.
That’s why park staff and volunteers greatly appreciate Mr. Clark and the Sabos for offering to present a benefit concert.
If you cannot attend the concert, you can still make a tax-deductible donation to the project. Donation envelopes, with attached tax-receipts, are available at the park office. We welcome your ideas and support as we move forward on this much-needed project.
For additional information, please contact ranger Jason Snow at 360/332-8221.
John Yirak, Park Volunteer
Blaine

The Editor:
Thanks to the volunteers who turned out on April 25 to weed and mulch the 890 seedlings on A Lot of Trees in Birch Bay.
The former and new Chums of Terrell Creek included Blaine high school students Connor Parks, Jaren Walker, and Izaak Wilkowski; Whatcom Community College student Brandon Muncy; Point Whitehorn residents Jeannie, Avery and Liam Lyons; Blaine resident Paula Payne; and Sylvia.
Particular appreciation goes to George Kaas, Blaine high school horticulture teacher and acting vice-principal, for inspiring his students. In addition, of course, thanks to The Northern Light for publicizing the activity.
Without the help of all these concerned individuals, we could not have prepared the sprouts for their future careers in purifying water and providing shade for salmon and other living things.
Ruth Higgins and Al Krause
Birch Bay

The Editor:
I’d like to congratulate Aaron Peterson for his second trophy in the Clancy dinghy sailing races here at the Blaine marina.
The Drayton Harbor Maritime community sailing program’s race was in conjunction with the International Yacht Club’s opening regatta held in Semiahmoo Bay last weekend. The IYC racers were on hand to cheer the Clancy sailors, who filled the fairway in view of Gate 2.
Getting special kudos are all the other Clancy racers who took part in the race with only a few minutes of practice, their first experience with sailing this year.
Well done, all!
Graham Hunter
DHM Sailing Program
Blaine

The Editor:
Sunday’s Drayton Harbor Maritime Community Sailing Regatta kicked off our second year of teaching sailing at the Blaine Harbor marina. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank some of the many people and businesses that have helped to make this coming season a success.
Community businesses and citizens including Banner Bank, Sterling Savings Bank, U.S. Bank, Hal Lavers, Greg Booth, Christie and Keenan Brookman, and Jacque and Sally Meijsen adopted all seven boats and put them in Bristol condition.
In addition, grants and donations were received from People’s Bank, Banner Bank, West Marine, Northwest Park and Recreation District #2, Merideth Goodman, Costco, and the Trillium Corporation.
So many thanks to all of our students and supporters from last season, and of course thank you Blaine Harbor marina and the Port of Bellingham for the use of the “Monkey Island” sailing area at gate #3 at the Blaine Harbor marina, and to The Northern Light for the fine sailing stories over the past two years.
For more information or to register for this summer’s sailing program, please contact Linda Roorda at the Northwest Park and Recreation at 360/656-6416 or Ron Snyder at 360/332-8082.
Ron Snyder
DHM school coordinator
Blaine

Letters Policy
The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank-you letters should be limited to 10 names. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please send your letter to:
225 Marine Drive, Blaine, WA 98230, fax 360/332-2777 or
E-mail:editor@thenorthernlight.com

Letters Policy

The Northern Light welcomes letters to the editor; however, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor. Letters must include name, address and daytime telephone number for verification. Letters must not exceed 350 words and may be edited or rejected for reasons of legality, length and good taste. Thank you letters are limited to five individuals or groups. A fresh viewpoint on matters of general interest to local readers will increase the likelihood of publication. Writers should avoid personal invective. Unsigned letters will not be accepted for publication. Requests for withholding names will be considered on an individual basis. Only one letter per month from an individual correspondent will be published.

Please email letters to letters@thenorthernlight.com